CHARLES DARWIN MEETS A BALEA NEGRA ON EARTH DAY

Estándar

Last 25th February Dr. Emilio Rolán (Departamento de Bioquímica, Xenética e Inmunoloxía – Facultade de Ciencias, Universidade de Vigo) gave 2nd, 3rd and 4th ESO students a lecture about Charles Darwin and adaptation.
In order to celebrate Earth Day we will work with the video he showed us.

selectyounaturally

We also include some pictures and activities about the visit some of you made to MARCO’s exhibition A Balea Negra – The Black Whale.
– 
Match every image with the right heading you will find CLICKING HERE.

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  1. A BALEA NEGRA-DESCRIPTIONS
    1-13. Man showing his pain.
    2-3. Newspaper’s cut extract. Man’s dream about the Black Whale.
    3-46. Man surrounded by his works of art on Camelle coast.
    4-29. Prestige shipwreck. Picture by Galician photographer Xurxo Lobato. 2003 Ortega y Gasset Journalism Award.

    5-24. Prestige’s bitt.
    6-52. Never Again (Nunca Máis) demonstration.
    7-32. Volunteer’s soup. Photograph by Allan Sekula. Black Tide, 2002.
    8-6. Children going to school under posters related to the black tide’s protests.
    9-40. Picture by Antón Patiño (1987), “Coast of Death” (Galicia)
    10-9. Students approaching False Movement (balance and economic sustainability) by Damián Ortega.1999 – 2003.

    11-1. Protest placard about governments’ lies about the Prestige and war in Irak.
    12-14. Green picture dealing with the impact of oil spills in nature and life.
    13-27. Students watching False Movement (balance and economic sustainability) by Damián Ortega.1999 – 2004.

    14-42. Volunteers collecting tar and oil from the sand.
    15-45. Students observing and talking about a photograph by Allan Sekula. Black Tide, 2002.
    16-35. “All of us are Never Again” magazine cover.
    17-23. Posters, postcards, cards and stickers related Never Again (Nunca Máis) movement. 2002 –2003.

    18-25. Protest placards relating Prestige’s black tide (“Never Again”) to Irak war (“No to War”)
    19-36. Students watching photographs by Allan Sekula Black Tide, 2002.
    20-28. RIP cross protesting against death in oceans.
    21-5. Students watching photographs by Allan Sekula Black Tide, 2002.
    22-30. Cartoon by El Roto “Somewhere on the east coast…OIL! WE’RE RICH!
    23-31. Rainbow Warrior(Greenpeace) in Galicia.
    24-8. Cartoon by El Roto “We must prevent the oil spill reaches cousciousness”
    25-4. Sailors’ demonstration before Compostela’s cathedral. “The burial”.
    26-11. Volunteer on the rocks surrounded by oil.
    27-47. Suitcases demonstration. A Coruña, 2003.
    28-38. “We need conscious citizens who think, demand and act” protest placard.
    29-39. Students listening to the guide’s explanations.
    30-41. Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from an old tin oil container(head) and a set of black, red and yellow wires (hair).

    31-7. Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from a blue plastic oil container (head) with a black hat on top.

    32-55. Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from a blue and yellow plastic oil container(head) and yellow rope(hair).

    33-44. Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from a plastic oil container. Black hair with braids and shells.

    34-10. Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from a plastic oil container. Black hair with shells.

    35-26.Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from a red plastic oil container and loudspeakers (ears) and machinery, electrical fuses, etc. (eyes and brains).

    36-17. Less oil, more courage. Rikrit Tiravanija, 2009.
    37-2. Students watching The Tar Museum by Mark Dion, 2006.
    38-48 .General view of The Tar Museum by Mark Dion, 2006.
    39-34. The Tar Museum – Mammal by Mark Dion, 2006.
    40-16. The Tar Museum – Flamingo by Mark Dion, 2006.
    41-53. The Tar Museum – Mallard by Mark Dion, 2006.
    42-49. Students watching a collection of cartoons by El Roto.
    43-43. Students listening to the guide before Alaskans still fighting for the Earth by Andrea Bowers and Mavis Müller (2009).

    44-50. Students opening a book with gloves on.
    45-33. Students putting on gloves to open a book.
    46-15. Pool by Marcela Armas, 2006. Tank with a car handle floating over burnt oil.
    47-51. Students reading The Postpetrolistic Internationale partiture by Christina Hemauer and Roman Keller, 2009 – 2012.

    48-12. Obradoiro Vocal Vila de Ponteareas singing The Postpetrolistic Internationale by Christina Hemauer and Roman Keller, 2009 – 2012 for A Balea Negra exhibition.

    49-37. Genocide in Nigeria, Collection of newspapers and articles written in the 1970s and 1980s by Saro-Wiwa. The articles document his political and environmental concerns about the fate of the Ogoni people and their mistreatment by multinational oil companies and collaborating Nigerian government. Saro-Wiwa argues that the Ogoni are a minority in Nigeria, exploited by the ruling ethnic majority, and that the Federal Government of Nigeria was threatening the Ogoni with genocide. At the time this was a key publication in bringing the Ogoni tragedy to the attention of the international community. Nowadays, it is of continual relevance to present day concerns about the actions of the oil companies, indigenous and environmental rights in the Delta region.

    50-54. Fragment from the weekly newspaper The Observer dealing with Saro-Wiwa excecution and Shell Oil Company’s involvement.

    51/52/53/54/55-18/19/20/21/22. “Lord take my soul, but the struggle continues”. Ken Saro-Wiwa last words before he was hanged in a prison in Port Harcourt, in eastern Nigeria, on the orders of General Abacha, the militeray leader of Nigeria. Ken Saro-Wiwa was a highly successful writer (Sozaboy, “A Novel in Rotten English”), producer of Nigeria’s most popular TV soap opera in the mideighthies “Basi & Co”, intellectual and activist.
    Saro-Wiwa was a member of the Ogoni people, an ethnic minority in Nigeria whose homeland, Ogoniland, in the Niger Delta has been targeted for crude oil extraction since the 1950s and which has suffered extreme environmental damage from decades of indiscriminate petroleum waste dumping. Initially as spokesperson, and then as President of the Movement for the Survival of the Ogoni People (MOSOP), Saro-Wiwa led a nonviolent campaign against environmental degradation of the land and waters of Ogoniland by the operations of the multinational petroleum industry, especially the Royal Dutch Shell Company.He was also an outspoken critic of the Nigerian government, which he viewed as reluctant to enforce environmental regulations on the foreign petroleum companies operating in the area.
    At the peak of his non-violent campaign, Saro-Wiwa was arrested, hastily tried by a special military tribunal and hanged in 1995 by the military government of General Sani Abacha, all on charges wideley viewed as entirely politically motivated and completely unfounded.His execution provoked international outrage and resulted in Nigeria’s suspension from the Commonwealth of Nations for over three years.

  2. 6- Never again (Nunca máis) demonstration.
    8- Children going to school under poster related to the black tide´s protets
    1- Man showing his pain.
    36- less oil more courage. Rickrit Tiravanija, 2009.
    27-Posters, postcards, cards and stickers related Never Again (Nunca Máis) movement. 2002 –
    2003
    18- Protest placards relating Prestige’s black tide (“Never Again”) to Irak war (“No to War”)
    51/52/53/54/55-“Lord take my soul, but the struggle continues”. Ken Saro-Wiwa last words
    before he was hanged in a prison in Port Harcourt, in eastern Nigeria, on the orders of General
    Abacha, the militeray leader of Nigeria. Ken Saro-Wiwa was a highly successful writer (Sozaboy,
    “A Novel in Rotten English”), producer of Nigeria’s most popular TV soap opera in the mideighthies
    “Basi & Co”, intellectual and activist.
    Saro-Wiwa was a member of the Ogoni people, an ethnic minority in Nigeria whose homeland,
    Ogoniland, in the Niger Delta has been targeted for crude oil extraction since the 1950s and which
    has suffered extreme environmental damage from decades of indiscriminate petroleum waste
    dumping. Initially as spokesperson, and then as President of the Movement for the Survival of the
    Ogoni People (MOSOP), Saro-Wiwa led a nonviolent campaign against environmental degradation
    of the land and waters of Ogoniland by the operations of the multinational petroleum industry,
    especially the Royal Dutch Shell Company. He was also an outspoken critic of the Nigerian
    government, which he viewed as reluctant to enforce environmental regulations on the foreign
    petroleum companies operating in the area.
    At the peak of his non-violent campaign, Saro-Wiwa was arrested, hastily tried by a special military
    tribunal and hanged in 1995 by the military government of General Sani Abacha, all on charges
    wideley viewed as entirely politically motivated and completely unfounded. His execution
    provoked international outrage and resulted in Nigeria’s suspension from the Commonwealth of
    Nations for over three years
    32– Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from a blue and yellow plastic oil container
    (head) and yellow rope (hair).
    33-Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from a plastic oil container. Black hair with
    braids and shells.
    30-Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from an old tin oil container (head) and a
    set of black, red and yellow wires (hair).
    20-RIP cross protesting against death in oceans.
    31- Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from a blue plastic oil container (head) with
    a black hat on top.
    2-Newspaper’s cut extract. Man’s dream about the Black Whale
    24-Cartoon by El Roto “We must prevent the oil spill reaches cousciousness”
    34-Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from a plastic oil container. Black hair with
    shells.
    50-Fragment from the weekly newspaper The Observer dealing with Saro-Wiwa excecution and
    Shell Oil Company’s involvement.
    3-Man surrounded by his works of art on Camelle coast
    28-“We need conscious citizens who think, demand and act” protest placard.
    49-Genocide in Nigeria, Collection of newspapers and articles written in the 1970s and 1980s by
    Saro-Wiwa. The articles document his political and environmental concerns about the fate of the
    Ogoni people and their mistreatment by multinational oil companies and collaborating Nigerian
    government. Saro-Wiwa argues that the Ogoni are a minority in Nigeria, exploited by the ruling
    ethnic majority, and that the Federal Government of Nigeria was threatening the Ogoni with
    genocide. At the time this was a key publication in bringing the Ogoni tragedy to the attention of the
    international community. Nowadays, it is of continual relevance to present day concerns about the
    actions of the oil companies, indigenous and environmental rights in the Delta region.
    7-Volunteer’s soup. Photograph by Allan Sekula. Black Tide, 2002.
    23-Rainbow Warrior (Greenpeace) in Galicia.
    22-Cartoon by El Roto “Somewhere on the east coast… OIL! WE’RE RICH!.
    48-Students reading The Postpetrolistic Internationale partiture by Christina Hemauer and Roman
    Keller, 2009 – 2012.
    44-Students opening a book with gloves on.
    35-Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from a red plastic oil container and
    loudspeakers (ears) and machinery, electrical fuses, etc. (eyes and brains).
    5- Prestige’s bitt.
    12-Green picture dealing with the impact of oil spills in nature and life.
    26-Volunteer on the rocks surrounded by oil.
    25-Sailors’ demonstration before Compostela’s cathedral. “The burial”.
    47-Obradoiro Vocal Vila de Ponteareas singing The Postpetrolistic Internationale by Christina
    43-Students listening to the guide before Alaskans still fighting for the Earth by Andrea Bowers
    and Mavis Müller (2009).
    37-Students watching The Tar Museum by Mark Dion, 2006..
    39-The Tar Museum – Mammal by Mark Dion, 2006.
    40-The Tar Museum – Flamingo by Mark Dion, 2006.
    45-Students putting on gloves to open a book.
    38-General view of The Tar Museum by Mark Dion, 2006.
    42-Students watching a collection of cartoons by El Roto.
    14-Volunteers collecting tar and oil from the sand.
    9-Pool by Marcela Armas, 2006. Tank with a car handle floating over burnt oil.
    41-The Tar Museum – Mallard by Mark Dion, 2006.
    10-Students watching False Movement (balance and economic sustainability) by Damián Ortega.
    13-Students approaching False Movement (balance and economic sustainability) by Damián Ortega.
    1999 – 2003.
    15-Students watching photographs by Allan Sekula Black Tide, 2002.
    16- “All of us are Never Again” magazine cover.
    19-Students watching photographs by Allan Sekula Black Tide, 2002.
    21- Students observing and talking about a photograph by Allan Sekula. Black Tide, 2002.
    11- Protest placard about governments’ lies about the Prestige and war in Irak.
    4-Prestige shipwreck. Picture by Galician photographer Xurxo Lobato. 2003 Ortega y Gasset
    Journalism Award.
    29-Students listening to the guide’s explanations.
    46-Suitcases demonstration. A Coruña, 2003.
    17-Picture by Antón Patiño (1987), “Coast of Death” (Galicia)

  3. 1-Man showing his pain.
    2-Newspaper’s cut extract. Man’s dream about the Black Whale
    3-Man surrounded by his works of art on Camelle coast.
    4-Prestige shipwreck. Picture by Galician photographer Xurxo Lobato. 2003 Ortega y Gasset
    Journalism Award.
    5-Prestige bitt
    6-Never Again (Nunca Máis) demonstration.
    7-Volunteer’s soup. Photography by Allan Sekula. Black Tide, 2002
    8-Children going to school under posters related to the black tide’s protests.
    9- Picture by Antón Patiño (1987), “Coast of Death” (Galicia)
    10-Students watching False Movement (balance and economic sustainability) by Damián Ortega. 1999 – 2004
    11-Protest placard about governments’ lies about the Prestige and war in Irak.
    12-Green picture dealing with the impact of oil spills in nature and life.
    13-Students approaching False Movement (balance and economic sustainability) by Damián Ortega.
    1999 – 2003.
    14-Volunteers collecting tar and oil from the sand.
    15-Students observing and talking about a photograph by Allan Sekula. Black Tide, 2002.
    16-“All of us are Never Again” magazine cover.
    17- Posters, postcards, cards and stickers related Never Again (Nunca Máis) movement. 2002 –2003.
    18-Protest placards relating Prestige’s black tide (“Never Again”) to Irak war (“No to War”)
    19- Students watching photographs by Allan Sekula Black Tide, 2002.
    20-RIP cross protesting against death in oceans.
    21-Students watching photographs by Allan Sekula Black Tide, 2002.
    22-Cartoon by El Roto “Somewhere on the east coast…OIL! WE’RE RICH!
    23- Rainbow Warrior(Greenpeace) in Galicia.
    24-Cartoon by El Roto “We must prevent the oil spill reaches cousciousness”
    25-Sailors’ demonstration before Compostela’s cathedral.“The burial”.
    26-Volunteer on the rocks surrounded by oil.
    27-Suitcases demonstration. A Coruña, 2003.
    28-“We need conscious citizens who think, demand and act” protest placard.
    29- Students listening to the guide’s explanations.
    30-Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from an old tin oil container(head) and a set of black, red and yellow wires (hair).
    31-Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from a blue plastic oil container (head) with a black hat on top.
    32-Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from a blue and yellow plastic oil container(head) and yellow rope(hair).
    33-Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from a plastic oil container. Black hair with braids and shells.
    34-Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from a plastic oil container. Black hair with shells.
    35-Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from a red plastic oil container and loudspeakers (ears) and machinery, electrical fuses, etc. (eyes and brains).
    36-Less oil, more courage. Rikrit Tiravanija, 2009.
    37-Students watching The Tar Museum by Mark Dion, 2006.
    38-General view of The Tar Museum by Mark Dion, 2006.
    39- The Tar Museum – Mammal by Mark Dion, 2006.
    40-The Tar Museum – Flamingo by Mark Dion, 2006.
    41-The Tar Museum – Mallard by Mark Dion, 2006.
    42-Students watching a collection of cartoons by El Roto.
    43-Students listening to the guide before Alaskans still fighting for the Earth by Andrea Bowers and Mavis Müller (2009).
    44-Students opening a book with gloves on.
    45-Students putting on gloves to open a book.
    46-Pool by Marcela Armas, 2006. Tank with a car handle floating over burnt oil.
    47-Students reading The Postpetrolistic Internationale partiture by Christina Hemauer and Roman Keller, 2009 – 2012
    48-Obradoiro Vocal Vila de Ponteareas singing The Postpetrolistic Internationale by Christina
    Hemauer and Roman Keller, 2009 – 2012 for A Balea Negra exhibition.
    49-Genocide in Nigeria, Collection of newspapers and articles written in the 1970s and 1980s by
    Saro-Wiwa. The articles document his political and environmental concerns about the fate of the
    Ogoni people and their mistreatment by multinational oil companies and collaborating Nigerian
    government. Saro-Wiwa argues that the Ogoni are a minority in Nigeria, exploited by the ruling
    ethnic majority, and that the Federal Government of Nigeria was threatening the Ogoni with
    genocide. At the time this was a key publication in bringing the Ogoni tragedy to the attention of the international community. Nowadays, it is of continual relevance to present day concerns about the actions of the oil companies, indigenous and environmental rights in the Delta region.
    50-Fragment from the weekly newspaper The Observer dealing with Saro-Wiwa excecution and
    Shell Oil Company’s involvement.
    51,52,53,54,55-“Lord take my soul, but the struggle continues”. Ken Saro-Wiwa last words
    before he was hanged in a prison in Port Harcourt, in eastern Nigeria, on the orders of General
    Abacha, the militeray leader of Nigeria. Ken Saro-Wiwa was a highly successful writer (Sozaboy,
    “A Novel in Rotten English”), producer of Nigeria’s most popular TV soap opera in the mideighthies “Basi & Co”, intellectual and activist.
    Saro-Wiwa was a member of the Ogoni people, an ethnic minority in Nigeria whose homeland,
    Ogoniland, in the Niger Delta has been targeted for crude oil extraction since the 1950s and which
    has suffered extreme environmental damage from decades of indiscriminate petroleum waste
    dumping. Initially as spokesperson, and then as President of the Movement for the Survival of the
    Ogoni People (MOSOP), Saro-Wiwa led a nonviolent campaign against environmental degradation of the land and waters of Ogoniland by the operations of the multinational petroleum industry, especially the Royal Dutch Shell Company. He was also an outspoken critic of the Nigerian government, which he viewed as reluctant to enforce environmental regulations on the foreign petroleum companies operating in the area.
    At the peak of his non-violent campaign, Saro-Wiwa was arrested, hastily tried by a special military tribunal and hanged in 1995 by the military government of General Sani Abacha, all on charges wideley viewed as entirely politically motivated and completely unfounded. His execution
    provoked international outrage and resulted in Nigeria’s suspension from the Commonwealth of
    Nations for over three years.

  4. Image 1- Man showing his pain.
    Image 2- New spaper´s cut extract. Man´s dream about the Black Whale.
    Image 3- Man surrounded bylis works of art on lamelle coast.
    Image 6- Never Again (Nunca máis) demostration.
    Image 8- Children going to school under posters related to the black tide´s protests.
    Image 10- Students watching False Movement (balance and economic sustainability) by Damián Ortega.1999 – 2004.
    Image 12- Green picture dealing with the impact of oil spills in nature and life.
    Image 13- Students watching False Moment (balance and economic sustain ability) by Damián Ortega.
    Image 14- Volunteers collecting tar and oil from the sand.
    Image 16- “All of us are Never Again” magazine cover.
    Image 17-Posters, postcards, cards and stickers related Never Again (Nunca Máis) movement. 2002 – 2003.
    Image 18-Protest placards relating Prestige’s black tide (“Never Again”) to Irak war (“No to War”)
    Image 20- RIP cross protesting against death in oceans
    Image 22-Cartoon by El Roto “Somewhere on the east coast… OIL! WE’RE RICH!.
    Image 23-Rainbow Warrior (Greenpeace) in Galicia.
    Image 24-Cartoon by El Roto “We must prevent the oil spill reaches cousciousness”
    Image 25-Sailors’ demonstration before Compostela’s cathedral. “The burial”
    Image 26-Volunteer on the rocks surrounded by oil.
    Image 27-Suitcases demonstration. A Coruña, 2003.
    Image 28-“We need conscious citizens who think, demand and act” protest placard.
    Image 30-Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from an old tin oil container (head) and a set of black, red and yellow wires (hair).
    Image 31-Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from a blue plastic oil container (head) with a black hat on top.
    Image 32-Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from a blue and yellow plastic oil container (head) and yellow rope (hair).
    Image 33-Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from a plastic oil container. Black hair with sells.
    Image 34-Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from a plastic oil container. Black hair with braids and shells.
    Image 35- Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from a red plastic oil container and
    loudspeakers (ears) and machinery, electrical fuses, etc. (eyes and brains).
    Image 36-Less oil, more courage. Rikrit Tiravanija, 2009.
    Image 40-The Tar Museum – Flamingo by Mark Dion, 2006.
    Image 43- Students listening to the guide before Alaskans still fighting for the Earth by Andrea Bowers and Mavis Müller (2009).
    Image 44-Students opening a book with gloves on.
    Image 45-Students putting on gloves to open a book.
    Image 47-Suitcases demonstration. A Coruña, 2003.
    Image 48-Obradoiro Vocal Vila de Ponteareas singing The Postpetrolistic Internationale by Christina Hemauer and Roman Keller, 2009 – 2012 for A Balea Negra exhibition.
    Image 49-Genocide in Nigeria, Collection of newspapers and articles written in the 1970s and 1980s by Saro-Wiwa. The articles document his political and environmental concerns about the fate of the
    Ogoni people and their mistreatment by multinational oil companies and collaborating Nigerian
    government. Saro-Wiwa argues that the Ogoni are a minority in Nigeria, exploited by the ruling
    ethnic majority, and that the Federal Government of Nigeria was threatening the Ogoni with
    genocide. At the time this was a key publication in bringing the Ogoni tragedy to the attention of the
    international community. Nowadays, it is of continual relevance to present day concerns about the
    actions of the oil companies, indigenous and environmental rights in the Delta region.

  5. 1-Man showing his pain.
    2-Newspaper’s cut extract. Man’s dream about the Black Whale
    3-Man surrounded by his works of art on Camelle coast.
    4-Prestige shipwreck. Picture by Galician photographer Xurxo Lobato. 2003 Ortega y Gasset
    Journalism Award.
    5-Prestige bitt
    6-Never Again (Nunca Máis) demonstration.
    7-Volunteer’s soup. Photography by Allan Sekula. Black Tide, 2002
    8-Children going to school under posters related to the black tide’s protests.
    9- Picture by Antón Patiño (1987), “Coast of Death” (Galicia)
    10-Students watching False Movement (balance and economic sustainability) by Damián Ortega. 1999 – 2004
    11-Protest placard about governments’ lies about the Prestige and war in Irak.
    12-Green picture dealing with the impact of oil spills in nature and life.
    13-Students approaching False Movement (balance and economic sustainability) by Damián Ortega.
    1999 – 2003.
    14-Volunteers collecting tar and oil from the sand.
    15-Students observing and talking about a photograph by Allan Sekula. Black Tide, 2002.
    16-“All of us are Never Again” magazine cover.
    17- Posters, postcards, cards and stickers related Never Again (Nunca Máis) movement. 2002 –2003.
    18-Protest placards relating Prestige’s black tide (“Never Again”) to Irak war (“No to War”)
    19- Students watching photographs by Allan Sekula Black Tide, 2002.
    20-RIP cross protesting against death in oceans.
    21-Students watching photographs by Allan Sekula Black Tide, 2002.
    22-Cartoon by El Roto “Somewhere on the east coast…OIL! WE’RE RICH!
    23- Rainbow Warrior(Greenpeace) in Galicia.
    24-Cartoon by El Roto “We must prevent the oil spill reaches cousciousness”
    25-Sailors’ demonstration before Compostela’s cathedral.“The burial”.
    26-Volunteer on the rocks surrounded by oil.
    27-Suitcases demonstration. A Coruña, 2003.
    28-“We need conscious citizens who think, demand and act” protest placard.
    29- Students listening to the guide’s explanations.
    30-Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from an old tin oil container(head) and a set of black, red and yellow wires (hair).
    31-Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from a blue plastic oil container (head) with a black hat on top.
    32-Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from a blue and yellow plastic oil container(head) and yellow rope(hair).
    33-Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from a plastic oil container. Black hair with braids and shells.
    34-Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from a plastic oil container. Black hair with shells.
    35-Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from a red plastic oil container and loudspeakers (ears) and machinery, electrical fuses, etc. (eyes and brains).
    36-Less oil, more courage. Rikrit Tiravanija, 2009.
    37-Students watching The Tar Museum by Mark Dion, 2006.
    38-General view of The Tar Museum by Mark Dion, 2006.
    39- The Tar Museum – Mammal by Mark Dion, 2006.
    40-The Tar Museum – Flamingo by Mark Dion, 2006.
    41-The Tar Museum – Mallard by Mark Dion, 2006.
    42-Students watching a collection of cartoons by El Roto.
    43-Students listening to the guide before Alaskans still fighting for the Earth by Andrea Bowers and Mavis Müller (2009).
    44-Students opening a book with gloves on.
    45-Students putting on gloves to open a book.
    46-Pool by Marcela Armas, 2006. Tank with a car handle floating over burnt oil.
    47-Students reading The Postpetrolistic Internationale partiture by Christina Hemauer and Roman Keller, 2009 – 2012
    48-Obradoiro Vocal Vila de Ponteareas singing The Postpetrolistic Internationale by Christina
    Hemauer and Roman Keller, 2009 – 2012 for A Balea Negra exhibition.
    49-Genocide in Nigeria, Collection of newspapers and articles written in the 1970s and 1980s by
    Saro-Wiwa. The articles document his political and environmental concerns about the fate of the
    Ogoni people and their mistreatment by multinational oil companies and collaborating Nigerian
    government. Saro-Wiwa argues that the Ogoni are a minority in Nigeria, exploited by the ruling
    ethnic majority, and that the Federal Government of Nigeria was threatening the Ogoni with
    genocide. At the time this was a key publication in bringing the Ogoni tragedy to the attention of the international community. Nowadays, it is of continual relevance to present day concerns about the actions of the oil companies, indigenous and environmental rights in the Delta region.
    50-Fragment from the weekly newspaper The Observer dealing with Saro-Wiwa excecution and
    Shell Oil Company’s involvement.
    51,52,53,54,55-“Lord take my soul, but the struggle continues”. Ken Saro-Wiwa last words
    before he was hanged in a prison in Port Harcourt, in eastern Nigeria, on the orders of General
    Abacha, the militeray leader of Nigeria. Ken Saro-Wiwa was a highly successful writer (Sozaboy,
    “A Novel in Rotten English”), producer of Nigeria’s most popular TV soap opera in the mideighthies “Basi & Co”, intellectual and activist.
    Saro-Wiwa was a member of the Ogoni people, an ethnic minority in Nigeria whose homeland,
    Ogoniland, in the Niger Delta has been targeted for crude oil extraction since the 1950s and which
    has suffered extreme environmental damage from decades of indiscriminate petroleum waste
    dumping. Initially as spokesperson, and then as President of the Movement for the Survival of the
    Ogoni People (MOSOP), Saro-Wiwa led a nonviolent campaign against environmental degradation of the land and waters of Ogoniland by the operations of the multinational petroleum industry, especially the Royal Dutch Shell Company. He was also an outspoken critic of the Nigerian government, which he viewed as reluctant to enforce environmental regulations on the foreign petroleum companies operating in the area.
    At the peak of his non-violent campaign, Saro-Wiwa was arrested, hastily tried by a special military tribunal and hanged in 1995 by the military government of General Sani Abacha, all on charges wideley viewed as entirely politically motivated and completely unfounded. His execution
    provoked international outrage and resulted in Nigeria’s suspension from the Commonwealth of
    Nations for over three years.

  6. 1-13. Man showing his pain.
    2-3. Newspaper’s cut extract. Man’s dream about the Black Whale.
    3-46. Man surrounded by his works of art on Camelle coast.
    4-29. Prestige shipwreck. Picture by Galician photographer Xurxo Lobato. 2003 Ortega y Gasset Journalism Award.

    5-24. Prestige’s bitt.
    6-52. Never Again (Nunca Máis) demonstration.
    7-32. Volunteer’s soup. Photograph by Allan Sekula. Black Tide, 2002.
    8-6. Children going to school under posters related to the black tide’s protests.
    9-40. Picture by Antón Patiño (1987), “Coast of Death” (Galicia)
    10-9. Students approaching False Movement (balance and economic sustainability) by Damián Ortega.1999 – 2003.

    11-1. Protest placard about governments’ lies about the Prestige and war in Irak.
    12-14. Green picture dealing with the impact of oil spills in nature and life.
    13-27. Students watching False Movement (balance and economic sustainability) by Damián Ortega.1999 – 2004.

    14-42. Volunteers collecting tar and oil from the sand.
    15-45. Students observing and talking about a photograph by Allan Sekula. Black Tide, 2002.
    16-35. “All of us are Never Again” magazine cover.
    17-23. Posters, postcards, cards and stickers related Never Again (Nunca Máis) movement. 2002 –2003.

    18-25. Protest placards relating Prestige’s black tide (“Never Again”) to Irak war (“No to War”)
    19-36. Students watching photographs by Allan Sekula Black Tide, 2002.
    20-28. RIP cross protesting against death in oceans.
    21-5. Students watching photographs by Allan Sekula Black Tide, 2002.
    22-30. Cartoon by El Roto “Somewhere on the east coast…OIL! WE’RE RICH!
    23-31. Rainbow Warrior(Greenpeace) in Galicia.
    24-8. Cartoon by El Roto “We must prevent the oil spill reaches cousciousness”
    25-4. Sailors’ demonstration before Compostela’s cathedral. “The burial”.
    26-11. Volunteer on the rocks surrounded by oil.
    27-47. Suitcases demonstration. A Coruña, 2003.
    28-38. “We need conscious citizens who think, demand and act” protest placard.
    29-39. Students listening to the guide’s explanations.
    30-41. Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from an old tin oil container(head) and a set of black, red and yellow wires (hair).

    31-7. Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from a blue plastic oil container (head) with a black hat on top.

    32-55. Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from a blue and yellow plastic oil container(head) and yellow rope(hair).

    33-44. Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from a plastic oil container. Black hair with braids and shells.

    34-10. Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from a plastic oil container. Black hair with shells.

    35-26.Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from a red plastic oil container and loudspeakers (ears) and machinery, electrical fuses, etc. (eyes and brains).

    36-17. Less oil, more courage. Rikrit Tiravanija, 2009.
    37-2. Students watching The Tar Museum by Mark Dion, 2006.
    38-48 .General view of The Tar Museum by Mark Dion, 2006.
    39-34. The Tar Museum – Mammal by Mark Dion, 2006.
    40-16. The Tar Museum – Flamingo by Mark Dion, 2006.
    41-53. The Tar Museum – Mallard by Mark Dion, 2006.
    42-49. Students watching a collection of cartoons by El Roto.
    43-43. Students listening to the guide before Alaskans still fighting for the Earth by Andrea Bowers and Mavis Müller (2009).

    44-50. Students opening a book with gloves on.
    45-33. Students putting on gloves to open a book.
    46-15. Pool by Marcela Armas, 2006. Tank with a car handle floating over burnt oil.
    47-51. Students reading The Postpetrolistic Internationale partiture by Christina Hemauer and Roman Keller, 2009 – 2012.

    48-12. Obradoiro Vocal Vila de Ponteareas singing The Postpetrolistic Internationale by Christina Hemauer and Roman Keller, 2009 – 2012 for A Balea Negra exhibition.

    49-37. Genocide in Nigeria, Collection of newspapers and articles written in the 1970s and 1980s by Saro-Wiwa. The articles document his political and environmental concerns about the fate of the Ogoni people and their mistreatment by multinational oil companies and collaborating Nigerian government. Saro-Wiwa argues that the Ogoni are a minority in Nigeria, exploited by the ruling ethnic majority, and that the Federal Government of Nigeria was threatening the Ogoni with genocide. At the time this was a key publication in bringing the Ogoni tragedy to the attention of the international community. Nowadays, it is of continual relevance to present day concerns about the actions of the oil companies, indigenous and environmental rights in the Delta region.

    50-54. Fragment from the weekly newspaper The Observer dealing with Saro-Wiwa excecution and Shell Oil Company’s involvement.

    51/52/53/54/55-18/19/20/21/22. “Lord take my soul, but the struggle continues”. Ken Saro-Wiwa last words before he was hanged in a prison in Port Harcourt, in eastern Nigeria, on the orders of General Abacha, the militeray leader of Nigeria. Ken Saro-Wiwa was a highly successful writer (Sozaboy, “A Novel in Rotten English”), producer of Nigeria’s most popular TV soap opera in the mideighthies “Basi & Co”, intellectual and activist.
    Saro-Wiwa was a member of the Ogoni people, an ethnic minority in Nigeria whose homeland, Ogoniland, in the Niger Delta has been targeted for crude oil extraction since the 1950s and which has suffered extreme environmental damage from decades of indiscriminate petroleum waste dumping. Initially as spokesperson, and then as President of the Movement for the Survival of the Ogoni People (MOSOP), Saro-Wiwa led a nonviolent campaign against environmental degradation of the land and waters of Ogoniland by the operations of the multinational petroleum industry, especially the Royal Dutch Shell Company.He was also an outspoken critic of the Nigerian government, which he viewed as reluctant to enforce environmental regulations on the foreign petroleum companies operating in the area.
    At the peak of his non-violent campaign, Saro-Wiwa was arrested, hastily tried by a special military tribunal and hanged in 1995 by the military government of General Sani Abacha, all on charges wideley viewed as entirely politically motivated and completely unfounded.His execution provoked international outrage and resulted in Nigeria’s suspension from the Commonwealth of Nations for over three years.

  7. ”A Balea Negra”:
    1->13. Man showing his pain.
    2->3. Newspaper’s cut extract. Man’s dream about the Black Whale.
    3->46. Man surrounded by his works of art on Camelle coast.
    4->29. Prestige shipwreck. Picture by Galician photographer Xurxo Lobato. 2003 Ortega y Gasset Journalism Award.

    5->24. Prestige’s bitt.
    6->52. Never Again (Nunca Máis) demonstration.
    7->32. Volunteer’s soup. Photograph by Allan Sekula. Black Tide, 2002.
    8->6. Children going to school under posters related to the black tide’s protests.
    9->40. Picture by Antón Patiño (1987), “Coast of Death” (Galicia)
    10->9. Students approaching False Movement (balance and economic sustainability) by Damián Ortega.1999 – 2003.

    11->1. Protest placard about governments’ lies about the Prestige and war in Irak.
    12->14. Green picture dealing with the impact of oil spills in nature and life.
    13->27. Students watching False Movement (balance and economic sustainability) by Damián Ortega.1999 – 2004.

    14->42. Volunteers collecting tar and oil from the sand.
    15->45. Students observing and talking about a photograph by Allan Sekula. Black Tide, 2002.
    16->35. “All of us are Never Again” magazine cover.
    17->23. Posters, postcards, cards and stickers related Never Again (Nunca Máis) movement. 2002 –2003.

    18->25. Protest placards relating Prestige’s black tide (“Never Again”) to Irak war (“No to War”)
    19->36. Students watching photographs by Allan Sekula Black Tide, 2002.
    20->28. RIP cross protesting against death in oceans.
    21->5. Students watching photographs by Allan Sekula Black Tide, 2002.
    22->30. Cartoon by El Roto “Somewhere on the east coast…OIL! WE’RE RICH!
    23->31. Rainbow Warrior(Greenpeace) in Galicia.
    24->8. Cartoon by El Roto “We must prevent the oil spill reaches cousciousness”
    25->4. Sailors’ demonstration before Compostela’s cathedral. “The burial”.
    26->11. Volunteer on the rocks surrounded by oil.
    27->47. Suitcases demonstration. A Coruña, 2003.
    28->38. “We need conscious citizens who think, demand and act” protest placard.
    29->39. Students listening to the guide’s explanations.
    30->41. Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from an old tin oil container(head) and a set of black, red and yellow wires (hair).

    31->7. Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from a blue plastic oil container (head) with a black hat on top.

    32->55. Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from a blue and yellow plastic oil container(head) and yellow rope(hair).

    33->44. Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from a plastic oil container. Black hair with braids and shells.

    34->10. Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from a plastic oil container. Black hair with shells.

    35->26.Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from a red plastic oil container and loudspeakers (ears) and machinery, electrical fuses, etc. (eyes and brains).

    36->17. Less oil, more courage. Rikrit Tiravanija, 2009.
    37->2. Students watching The Tar Museum by Mark Dion, 2006.
    38->48 .General view of The Tar Museum by Mark Dion, 2006.
    39->34. The Tar Museum – Mammal by Mark Dion, 2006.
    40->16. The Tar Museum – Flamingo by Mark Dion, 2006.
    41->53. The Tar Museum – Mallard by Mark Dion, 2006.
    42->49. Students watching a collection of cartoons by El Roto.
    43->43. Students listening to the guide before Alaskans still fighting for the Earth by Andrea Bowers and Mavis Müller (2009).

    44->50. Students opening a book with gloves on.
    45->33. Students putting on gloves to open a book.
    46->15. Pool by Marcela Armas, 2006. Tank with a car handle floating over burnt oil.
    47->51. Students reading The Postpetrolistic Internationale partiture by Christina Hemauer and Roman Keller, 2009 – 2012.

    48->12. Obradoiro Vocal Vila de Ponteareas singing The Postpetrolistic Internationale by Christina Hemauer and Roman Keller, 2009 – 2012 for A Balea Negra exhibition.

    49->37. Genocide in Nigeria, Collection of newspapers and articles written in the 1970s and 1980s by Saro-Wiwa. The articles document his political and environmental concerns about the fate of the Ogoni people and their mistreatment by multinational oil companies and collaborating Nigerian government. Saro-Wiwa argues that the Ogoni are a minority in Nigeria, exploited by the ruling ethnic majority, and that the Federal Government of Nigeria was threatening the Ogoni with genocide. At the time this was a key publication in bringing the Ogoni tragedy to the attention of the international community. Nowadays, it is of continual relevance to present day concerns about the actions of the oil companies, indigenous and environmental rights in the Delta region.

    50->54. Fragment from the weekly newspaper The Observer dealing with Saro-Wiwa excecution and Shell Oil Company’s involvement.

    51/52/53/54/55-18/19/20/21/22. “Lord take my soul, but the struggle continues”. Ken Saro-Wiwa last words before he was hanged in a prison in Port Harcourt, in eastern Nigeria, on the orders of General Abacha, the militeray leader of Nigeria. Ken Saro-Wiwa was a highly successful writer (Sozaboy, “A Novel in Rotten English”), producer of Nigeria’s most popular TV soap opera in the mideighthies “Basi & Co”, intellectual and activist.
    Saro-Wiwa was a member of the Ogoni people, an ethnic minority in Nigeria whose homeland, Ogoniland, in the Niger Delta has been targeted for crude oil extraction since the 1950s and which has suffered extreme environmental damage from decades of indiscriminate petroleum waste dumping. Initially as spokesperson, and then as President of the Movement for the Survival of the Ogoni People (MOSOP), Saro-Wiwa led a nonviolent campaign against environmental degradation of the land and waters of Ogoniland by the operations of the multinational petroleum industry, especially the Royal Dutch Shell Company.He was also an outspoken critic of the Nigerian government, which he viewed as reluctant to enforce environmental regulations on the foreign petroleum companies operating in the area.
    At the peak of his non-violent campaign, Saro-Wiwa was arrested, hastily tried by a special military tribunal and hanged in 1995 by the military government of General Sani Abacha, all on charges wideley viewed as entirely politically motivated and completely unfounded.His execution provoked international outrage and resulted in Nigeria’s suspension from the Commonwealth of Nations for over three years.

  8. Photo 1-Man showing his pain.

    Photo 2-Newspaper’s cut extract. Man’s dream about the Black Whale

    Photo 3-Man surrounded by his works of art on Camelle coast.

    Photo 4-Prestige shipwreck. Picture by Galician photographer Xurxo Lobato. 2003 Ortega y Gasset Journalism Award.

    Photo 5-Prestige bitt

    Photo 6-Never Again (Nunca Máis) demonstration.

    Photo 7-Volunteer’s soup. Photography by Allan Sekula. Black Tide, 2002

    Photo 8-Children going to school under posters related to the black tide’s protests.

    Photo 9- Picture by Antón Patiño (1987), “Coast of Death” (Galicia)

    Photo 10-Students watching False Movement (balance and economic sustainability) by Damián Ortega. 1999 – 2004

    Photo 11-Protest placard about governments’ lies about the Prestige and war in Irak.

    Photo 12-Green picture dealing with the impact of oil spills in nature and life.

    Photo 13-Students approaching False Movement (balance and economic sustainability) by Damián Ortega 1999 – 2003.

    Photo 14-Volunteers collecting tar and oil from the sand.

    Photo 15-Students observing and talking about a photograph by Allan Sekula. Black Tide, 2002.

    Photo 16-“All of us are Never Again” magazine cover.

    Photo 17- Posters, postcards, cards and stickers related Never Again (Nunca Máis) movement. 2002 –2003.

    Photo 18-Protest placards relating Prestige’s black tide (“Never Again”) to Irak war (“No to War”)

    Photo 19- Students watching photographs by Allan Sekula Black Tide, 2002.

    Photo 20-RIP cross protesting against death in oceans.

    Photo 21-Students watching photographs by Allan Sekula Black Tide, 2002.

    Photo 22-Cartoon by El Roto “Somewhere on the east coast…OIL! WE’RE RICH!

    Photo 23- Rainbow Warrior(Greenpeace) in Galicia.

    Photo 24-Cartoon by El Roto “We must prevent the oil spill reaches cousciousness”

    Photo 25-Sailors’ demonstration before Compostela’s cathedral.“The burial”.

    Photo 26-Volunteer on the rocks surrounded by oil.

    Photo 27-Suitcases demonstration. A Coruña, 2003.

    Photo 28-“We need conscious citizens who think, demand and act” protest placard.

    Photo 29- Students listening to the guide’s explanations.

    Photo 30-Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from an old tin oil container(head) and a set of black, red and yellow wires (hair).

    Photo 31-Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from a blue plastic oil container (head) with a black hat on top.

    Photo 32-Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from a blue and yellow plastic oil container(head) and yellow rope(hair).

    Photo 33-Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from a plastic oil container. Black hair with braids and shells.

    Photo 34-Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from a plastic oil container. Black hair with shells.

    Photo 35-Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from a red plastic oil container and loudspeakers (ears) and machinery, electrical fuses, etc. (eyes and brains).

    Photo 36-Less oil, more courage. Rikrit Tiravanija, 2009.

    Photo 37-Students watching The Tar Museum by Mark Dion, 2006.

    Photo 38-General view of The Tar Museum by Mark Dion, 2006.

    Photo 39- The Tar Museum – Mammal by Mark Dion, 2006.

    Photo 40-The Tar Museum – Flamingo by Mark Dion, 2006.

    Photo 41-The Tar Museum – Mallard by Mark Dion, 2006.

    Photo 42-Students watching a collection of cartoons by El Roto.

    Photo 43-Students listening to the guide before Alaskans still fighting for the Earth by Andrea Bowers and Mavis Müller (2009).

    Photo 44-Students opening a book with gloves on.

    Photo 45-Students putting on gloves to open a book.

    Photo 46-Pool by Marcela Armas, 2006. Tank with a car handle floating over burnt oil.

    Photo 47-Students reading The Postpetrolistic Internationale partiture by Christina Hemauer and Roman Keller, 2009 – 2012.

    Photo 48-Obradoiro Vocal Vila de Ponteareas singing The Postpetrolistic Internationale by Christina Hemauer and Roman Keller, 2009 – 2012 for A Balea Negra exhibition.

    Photo 49-Genocide in Nigeria, Collection of newspapers and articles written in the 1970s and 1980s by Saro-Wiwa. The articles document his political and environmental concerns about the fate of the Ogoni people and their mistreatment by multinational oil companies and collaborating Nigerian government. Saro-Wiwa argues that the Ogoni are a minority in Nigeria, exploited by the ruling ethnic majority, and that the Federal Government of Nigeria was threatening the Ogoni with genocide. At the time this was a key publication in bringing the Ogoni tragedy to the attention of the international community. Nowadays, it is of continual relevance to present day concerns about the actions of the oil companies, indigenous and environmental rights in the Delta region.

    Photo 50-Fragment from the weekly newspaper The Observer dealing with Saro-Wiwa excecution and Shell Oil Company’s involvement.

    Photos 51-55 -“Lord take my soul, but the struggle continues”. Ken Saro-Wiwa last words before he was hanged in a prison in Port Harcourt, in eastern Nigeria, on the orders of General Abacha, the militeray leader of Nigeria. Ken Saro-Wiwa was a highly successful writer (Sozaboy, “A Novel in Rotten English”), producer of Nigeria’s most popular TV soap opera in the mideighthies “Basi & Co”, intellectual and activist. Saro-Wiwa was a member of the Ogoni people, an ethnic minority in Nigeria whose homeland, Ogoniland, in the Niger Delta has been targeted for crude oil extraction since the 1950s and which has suffered extreme environmental damage from decades of indiscriminate petroleum wastedumping. Initially as spokesperson, and then as President of the Movement for the Survival of the Ogoni People (MOSOP), Saro-Wiwa led a nonviolent campaign against environmental degradation of the land and waters of Ogoniland by the operations of the multinational petroleum industry, especially the Royal Dutch Shell Company. He was also an outspoken critic of the Nigerian government, which he viewed as reluctant to enforce environmental regulations on the foreign petroleum companies operating in the area.
    At the peak of his non-violent campaign, Saro-Wiwa was arrested, hastily tried by a special military tribunal and hanged in 1995 by the military government of General Sani Abacha, all on charges wideley viewed as entirely politically motivated and completely unfounded. His execution provoked international outrage and resulted in Nigeria’s suspension from the Commonwealth of Nations for over three years.

  9. Sorry , I put the previous coment accidentally :S
    1º Man Showing his pain.
    2º Newspaper’s cut extract. Man’s deam about the Black Whale.
    3º Man surrounded by his works of art on Camelle coast.
    4º Prestige shipwreck. Picture by Galician photographer Xurxo Lobato. 2003 Ortega y Gasset
    Journalism Award.
    5º Prestige’s bitt.
    6º Never Again (Nunca Máis) demonstration.
    7º Volunteer’s soup. Photograph by Allan Sekula. Black Tide, 2002.
    8º Children going to school under posters related to the black tide’s protests.
    9º Picture by Antón Patiño (1987), “Coast of Death” (Galicia).
    10º Students approaching False Movement (balance and economic sustainability) by Damián Ortega. 1999 – 2003.
    11ºProtest placard about governments’ lies about the Prestige and war in Irak.
    12º Green picture dealing with the impact of oil spills in nature and life.
    13º Students watching False Movement (balance and economic sustainability) by Damián Ortega.
    14º Volunteers collecting tar and oil from the sand.
    15º Students observing and talking about a photograph by Allan Sekula. Black Tide, 2002.
    16º “All of us are Never Again” magazine cover.
    17º Posters, postcards, cards and stickers related Never Again (Nunca Máis) movement. 2002 – 2003.
    18º Protest placards relating Prestige’s black tide (“Never Again”) to Irak war (“No to War”).
    19º Students watching photographs by Allan Sekula Black Tide, 2002.
    20º RIP cross protesting against death in oceans.
    21º Students watching photographs by Allan Sekula Black Tide, 2002.
    22º Cartoon by El Roto “Somewhere on the east coast…OIL! WE’RE RICH!.
    23º Rainbow Warrior (Greenpeace) in Galicia.
    24º Cartoon by El Roto “We must prevent the oil spill reaches cousciousness”.
    25º Sailors’ demonstration before Compostela’s cathedral. “The burial”.
    26º Volunteer on the rocks surrounded by oil.
    27º Suitcases demonstration. A Coruña, 2003.
    28º “We need conscious citizens who think, demand and act” protest placard.
    29º Students listening to the guide’s explanations.
    30º Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from an old tin oil container (head) and a set of black, red and yellow wires (hair).
    31º Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from a blue plastic oil container (head) with a black hat on top.
    32º Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from a blue and yellow plastic oil container(head) and yellow rope (hair).
    33º Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from a plastic oil container. Black hair with braids and shells.
    34º Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from a plastic oil container. Black hair with shells.
    35º Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from a red plastic oil container and
    loudspeakers (ears) and machinery, electrical fuses, etc. (eyes and brains).
    36º Less oil, more courage. Rikrit Tiravanija, 2009.
    37º Students watching The Tar Museum by Mark Dion, 2006.
    38º General view of The Tar Museum by Mark Dion, 2006.
    39º The Tar Museum – Mammal by Mark Dion, 2006.
    40º The Tar Museum – Flamingo by Mark Dion, 2006.
    41º The Tar Museum – Mallard by Mark Dion, 2006.
    42º Students watching a collection of cartoons by El Roto.
    43º Students listening to the guide before Alaskans still fighting for the Earth by Andrea Bowers and Mavis Müller (2009).
    44º Students opening a book with gloves on.
    45º Students putting on gloves to open a book.
    46º Pool by Marcela Armas, 2006. Tank with a car handle floating over burnt oil.
    47º Students reading The Postpetrolistic Internationale partiture by Christina Hemauer and Roman Keller, 2009 – 2012.
    48º Obradoiro Vocal Vila de Ponteareas singing The Postpetrolistic Internationale by Christina Hemauer and Roman Keller, 2009 – 2012 for A Balea Negra exhibition.
    49º Genocide in Nigeria, Collection of newspapers and articles written in the 1970s and 1980s by Saro-Wiwa. The articles document his political and environmental concerns about the fate of the Ogoni people and their mistreatment by multinational oil companies and collaborating Nigerian government. Saro-Wiwa argues that the Ogoni are a minority in Nigeria, exploited by the ruling ethnic majority, and that the Federal Government of Nigeria was threatening the Ogoni with genocide. At the time this was a key publication in bringing the Ogoni tragedy to the attention of theinternational community. Nowadays, it is of continual relevance to present day concerns about the actions of the oil companies, indigenous and environmental rights in the Delta region.
    50º Fragment from the weekly newspaper The Observer dealing with Saro-Wiwa excecution and Shell Oil Company’s involvement.
    51º “Lord take my soul, but the struggle continues”. Ken Saro-Wiwa last words
    before he was hanged in a prison in Port Harcourt, in eastern Nigeria, on the orders of General Abacha, the militeray leader of Nigeria. Ken Saro-Wiwa was a highly successful writer (Sozaboy, “A Novel in Rotten English”), producer of Nigeria’s most popular TV soap opera in the mideighthies “Basi & Co”, intellectual and activist. Saro-Wiwa was a member of the Ogoni people, an ethnic minority in Nigeria whose homeland, Ogoniland, in the Niger Delta has been targeted for crude oil extraction since the 1950s and which has suffered extreme environmental damage from decades of indiscriminate petroleum waste dumping. Initially as spokesperson, and then as President of the Movement for the Survival of the Ogoni People (MOSOP), Saro-Wiwa led a nonviolent campaign against environmental degradation of the land and waters of Ogoniland by the operations of the multinational petroleum industry, especially the Royal Dutch Shell Company. He was also an outspoken critic of the Nigerian government, which he viewed as reluctant to enforce environmental regulations on the foreign petroleum companies operating in the area. At the peak of his non-violent campaign, Saro-Wiwa was arrested, hastily tried by a special militarytribunal and hanged in 1995 by the military government of General Sani Abacha, all on charges wideley viewed as entirely politically motivated and completely unfounded. His execution
    provoked international outrage and resulted in Nigeria’s suspension from the Commonwealth of Nations for over three years.
    🙂

  10. A Balea Negra

    1) – 13) Man showing his pain.
    2) – 3) Newspaper’s cut extract. Man’s dream about the Black Whale.
    3) – 46) Man surrounded by his works of art on Camelle coast.
    4) – 29) Prestige shipwreck. Picture by Galician photographer Xurxo Lobato. 2003 Ortega y Gasset Journalism Award.
    5) – 24) Prestige’s bitt.
    6) – 52) Never Again (Nunca Máis) demonstration.
    7) – 32) Volunteer’s soup. Photograph by Allan Sekula. Black Tide, 2002.
    8) – 6) Children going to school under posters related to the black tide’s protests.
    9) – 40) Picture by Antón Patiño (1987), “Coast of Death” (Galicia)
    10) – 9) Students approaching False Movement (balance and economic sustainability) by Damián Ortega . 1999 – 2003.
    11) – 1) Protest placard about governments’ lies about the Prestige and war in Irak.
    12) – 14) Green picture dealing with the impact of oil spills in nature and life.
    13) – 27) Green picture dealing with the impact of oil spills in nature and life
    14) – 42) Volunteers collecting tar and oil from the sand.
    15) – 45) Students observing and talking about a photograph by Allan Sekula. Black Tide, 2002.
    16) – 35) “All of us are Never Again” magazine cover.
    17)- 23) Posters, postcards, cards and stickers related Never Again (Nunca Máis) movement. 2002 – 2003
    18) – 25) Protest placards relating Prestige’s black tide (“Never Again”) to Irak war (“No to War”).
    19) – 36) Students watching photographs by Allan Sekula Black Tide, 2002.
    20) – 28) RIP cross protesting against death in oceans.
    21) – 5) Students watching photographs by Allan Sekula Black Tide, 2002.
    22) – 30) Cartoon by El Roto “Somewhere on the east coast… OIL! WE’RE RICH!.
    23) – 31) Rainbow Warrior (Greenpeace) in Galicia.
    24) – 8) Cartoon by El Roto “We must prevent the oil spill reaches cousciousness”.
    25) – 4) Sailors’ demonstration before Compostela’s cathedral. “The burial”.
    26) – 11) Volunteer on the rocks surrounded by oil.
    27) – 47) Suitcases demonstration. A Coruña, 2003.
    28) – 38) “We need conscious citizens who think, demand and act” protest placard.
    29)- 39) Students listening to the guide’s explanations.
    30) – 41) Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from an old tin oil container (head) and a set of black, red and yellow wires (hair).
    31) – 7) Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from a blue plastic oil container (head) with a black hat on top.
    32) – 55) Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from a blue and yellow plastic oil container (head) and yellow rope (hair).
    33) – 44)Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from a plastic oil container. Black hair with braids and shells.
    34)- 10) – Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from a plastic oil container. Black hair with shells.
    35) – 26) Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from a red plastic oil container and
    loudspeakers (ears) and machinery, electrical fuses, etc. (eyes and brains).
    36) – 17) Less oil, more courage. Rikrit Tiravanija, 2009.
    37) – 2) Students watching The Tar Museum by Mark Dion, 2006.
    38) – 48) General view of The Tar Museum by Mark Dion, 2006.
    39) – 34) The Tar Museum – Mammal by Mark Dion, 2006.
    40) – 16) The Tar Museum – Flamingo by Mark Dion, 2006.
    41) – 53) The Tar Museum – Mallard by Mark Dion, 2006.
    42) – 49) The Tar Museum – Mallard by Mark Dion, 2006.
    43) – 43) Students listening to the guide before Alaskans still fighting for the Earth by Andrea Bowers and Mavis Müller (2009).
    44) – 50) Students opening a book with gloves on.
    45) – 33) Students putting on gloves to open a book.
    46) – 15) Pool by Marcela Armas, 2006. Tank with a car handle floating over burnt oil.
    47) – 51) Students reading The Postpetrolistic Internationale partiture by Christina Hemauer and Roman Keller, 2009 – 2012.
    48 ) – 12) Obradoiro Vocal Vila de Ponteareas singing The Postpetrolistic Internationale by Christina Hemauer and Roman Keller, 2009 – 2012 for A Balea Negra exhibition.
    49) – 37) Genocide in Nigeria, Collection of newspapers and articles written in the 1970s and 1980s by Saro-Wiwa. The articles document his political and environmental concerns about the fate of the Ogoni people and their mistreatment by multinational oil companies and collaborating Nigerian government. Saro-Wiwa argues that the Ogoni are a minority in Nigeria, exploited by the ruling ethnic majority, and that the Federal Government of Nigeria was threatening the Ogoni with
    genocide. At the time this was a key publication in bringing the Ogoni tragedy to the attention of theinternational community. Nowadays, it is of continual relevance to present day concerns about the actions of the oil companies, indigenous and environmental rights in the Delta region.
    50) – 54) Fragment from the weekly newspaper The Observer dealing with Saro-Wiwa excecution and Shell Oil Company’s involvement.
    51 ) – 18 / 19 / 20 / 21 / 22 ) “Lord take my soul, but the struggle continues”. Ken Saro-Wiwa last words before he was hanged in a prison in Port Harcourt, in eastern Nigeria, on the orders of General Abacha, the militeray leader of Nigeria. Ken Saro-Wiwa was a highly successful writer (Sozaboy, “A Novel in Rotten English”), producer of Nigeria’s most popular TV soap opera in the mideighthies “Basi & Co”, intellectual and activist. Saro-Wiwa was a member of the Ogoni people, an ethnic minority in Nigeria whose homeland, Ogoniland, in the Niger Delta has been targeted for crude oil extraction since the 1950s and which has suffered extreme environmental damage from decades of indiscriminate petroleum waste dumping. Initially as spokesperson, and then as President of the Movement for the Survival of the Ogoni People (MOSOP), Saro-Wiwa led a nonviolent campaign against environmental degradation of the land and waters of Ogoniland by the operations of the multinational petroleum industry, especially the Royal Dutch Shell Company. He was also an outspoken critic of the Nigerian government, which he viewed as reluctant to enforce environmental regulations on the foreign petroleum companies operating in the area.
    At the peak of his non-violent campaign, Saro-Wiwa was arrested, hastily tried by a special militarytribunal and hanged in 1995 by the military government of General Sani Abacha, all on charges wideley viewed as entirely politically motivated and completely unfounded. His execution
    provoked international outrage and resulted in Nigeria’s suspension from the Commonwealth of
    Nations for over three years.

  11. 1- Man showing his pain.
    2- New spaper´s cut extract. Man´s dream about the Black Whale.
    3- Man surrounded bylis works of art on lamelle coast.
    6- Never Again (Nunca máis) demostration.
    8- Children going to school under posters related to the black tide´s protests.
    10- Students watching False Movement (balance and economic sustainability) by Damián
    Ortega.1999 – 2004.
    12- Green picture dealing with the impact of oil spills in nature and life.
    13- Students watching False Moment (balance and economic sustain ability) by Damián Ortega.
    14- Volunteers collecting tar and oil from the sand.
    16- “All of us are Never Again” magazine cover.
    17-Posters, postcards, cards and stickers related Never Again (Nunca Máis) movement. 2002 – 2003.
    18-Protest placards relating Prestige’s black tide (“Never Again”) to Irak war (“No to War”)
    20- RIP cross protesting against death in oceans
    22-Cartoon by El Roto “Somewhere on the east coast… OIL! WE’RE RICH!.
    23-Rainbow Warrior (Greenpeace) in Galicia.
    24-Cartoon by El Roto “We must prevent the oil spill reaches cousciousness”
    25-Sailors’ demonstration before Compostela’s cathedral. “The burial”
    26-Volunteer on the rocks surrounded by oil.
    27-Suitcases demonstration. A Coruña, 2003.
    28-“We need conscious citizens who think, demand and act” protest placard.
    30-Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from an old tin oil container (head) and a set of black, red and yellow wires (hair).
    31-Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from a blue plastic oil container (head) with a black hat on top.
    32-Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from a blue and yellow plastic oil container (head) and yellow rope (hair).
    33-Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from a plastic oil container. Black hair with sells.
    34-Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from a plastic oil container. Black hair with braids and shells.
    35- Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from a red plastic oil container and
    loudspeakers (ears) and machinery, electrical fuses, etc. (eyes and brains).
    36-Less oil, more courage. Rikrit Tiravanija, 2009.
    40-The Tar Museum – Flamingo by Mark Dion, 2006.
    43- Students listening to the guide before Alaskans still fighting for the Earth by Andrea Bowers and Mavis Müller (2009).
    44-Students opening a book with gloves on.
    45-Students putting on gloves to open a book.
    47-Suitcases demonstration. A Coruña, 2003.
    48-Obradoiro Vocal Vila de Ponteareas singing The Postpetrolistic Internationale by Christina Hemauer and Roman Keller, 2009 – 2012 for A Balea Negra exhibition.
    49-Genocide in Nigeria, Collection of newspapers and articles written in the 1970s and 1980s by Saro-Wiwa. The articles document his political and environmental concerns about the fate of the
    Ogoni people and their mistreatment by multinational oil companies and collaborating Nigerian
    government. Saro-Wiwa argues that the Ogoni are a minority in Nigeria, exploited by the ruling
    ethnic majority, and that the Federal Government of Nigeria was threatening the Ogoni with
    genocide. At the time this was a key publication in bringing the Ogoni tragedy to the attention of the
    international community. Nowadays, it is of continual relevance to present day concerns about the
    actions of the oil companies, indigenous and environmental rights in the Delta region.

  12. ·1(13). Man showing his pain.
    ·2(3). Newspaper’s cut extract. Man’s dream about the Black Whale.
    ·3(46). Man surrounded by his works of art on Camelle coast.
    ·4(29). Prestige shipwreck. Picture by Galician photographer Xurxo Lobato. 2003 Ortega y Gasset Journalism Award.5(24). Prestige’s bitt.
    ·6(52). Never Again (Nunca Máis) demonstration.
    ·7(32). Volunteer’s soup. Photograph by Allan Sekula. Black Tide, 2002.
    ·8(6). Children going to school under posters related to the black tide’s protests.
    ·9(40). Picture by Antón Patiño (1987), “Coast of Death” (Galicia)
    ·10(9). Students approaching False Movement (balance and economic sustainability) by Damián Ortega.1999 – 2003.·11(1). Protest placard about governments’ lies about the Prestige and war in Irak.
    ·12(14). Green picture dealing with the impact of oil spills in nature and life.
    ·13(27). Students watching False Movement (balance and economic sustainability) by Damián Ortega.1999 – 2004.·14(42). Volunteers collecting tar and oil from the sand.
    ·15(45). Students observing and talking about a photograph by Allan Sekula. Black Tide, 2002.
    ·16(35). “All of us are Never Again” magazine cover.
    ·17(23). Posters, postcards, cards and stickers related Never Again (Nunca Máis) movement. 2002 –2003.·18(25). Protest placards relating Prestige’s black tide (“Never Again”) to Irak war (“No to War”)
    ·19(36). Students watching photographs by Allan Sekula Black Tide, 2002.
    ·20(28). RIP cross protesting against death in oceans.
    ·21(5). Students watching photographs by Allan Sekula Black Tide, 2002.
    ·22(30). Cartoon by El Roto “Somewhere on the east coast…OIL! WE’RE RICH!
    ·23(31). Rainbow Warrior(Greenpeace) in Galicia.
    ·24(8). Cartoon by El Roto “We must prevent the oil spill reaches cousciousness”
    ·25(4). Sailors’ demonstration before Compostela’s cathedral. “The burial”.
    ·26(11). Volunteer on the rocks surrounded by oil.
    ·27(47). Suitcases demonstration. A Coruña, 2003.
    ·28(38). “We need conscious citizens who think, demand and act” protest placard.
    ·29(39). Students listening to the guide’s explanations.
    ·30(41). Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from an old tin oil container(head) and a set of black, red and yellow wires (hair).·31((7). Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from a blue plastic oil container (head) with a black hat on top.·32(55). Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from a blue and yellow plastic oil container(head) and yellow rope(hair).·33(44). Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from a plastic oil container. Black hair with braids and shells.·34(10). Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from a plastic oil container. Black hair with shells.·35(26).Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from a red plastic oil container and loudspeakers (ears) and machinery, electrical fuses, etc. (eyes and brains).·36(17). Less oil, more courage. Rikrit Tiravanija, 2009.
    ·37(2). Students watching The Tar Museum by Mark Dion, 2006.
    ·38(48) .General view of The Tar Museum by Mark Dion, 2006.
    ·39(34). The Tar Museum – Mammal by Mark Dion, 2006.
    ·40(16). The Tar Museum – Flamingo by Mark Dion, 2006.
    ·41(53). The Tar Museum – Mallard by Mark Dion, 2006.
    ·42(49). Students watching a collection of cartoons by El Roto.
    ·43(43). Students listening to the guide before Alaskans still fighting for the Earth by Andrea Bowers and Mavis Müller (2009).·44(50). Students opening a book with gloves on.
    ·45(33). Students putting on gloves to open a book.
    ·46(15). Pool by Marcela Armas, 2006. Tank with a car handle floating over burnt oil.
    ·47(51). Students reading The Postpetrolistic Internationale partiture by Christina Hemauer and Roman Keller, 2009 – 2012.·48(12). Obradoiro Vocal Vila de Ponteareas singing The Postpetrolistic Internationale by Christina Hemauer and Roman Keller, 2009 – 2012 for A Balea Negra exhibition.·49(37). Genocide in Nigeria, Collection of newspapers and articles written in the 1970s and 1980s by Saro-Wiwa. The articles document his political and environmental concerns about the fate of the Ogoni people and their mistreatment by multinational oil companies and collaborating Nigerian government. Saro-Wiwa argues that the Ogoni are a minority in Nigeria, exploited by the ruling ethnic majority, and that the Federal Government of Nigeria was threatening the Ogoni with genocide. At the time this was a key publication in bringing the Ogoni tragedy to the attention of the international community. Nowadays, it is of continual relevance to present day concerns about the actions of the oil companies, indigenous and environmental rights in the Delta region.·50(54). Fragment from the weekly newspaper The Observer dealing with Saro-Wiwa excecution and Shell Oil Company’s involvement.·51-52-53-54-55(18-19-20-21-22.) “Lord take my soul, but the struggle continues”. Ken Saro-Wiwa last words before he was hanged in a prison in Port Harcourt, in eastern Nigeria, on the orders of General Abacha, the militeray leader of Nigeria. Ken Saro-Wiwa was a highly successful writer (Sozaboy, “A Novel in Rotten English”), producer of Nigeria’s most popular TV soap opera in the mideighthies “Basi & Co”, intellectual and activist.
    Saro-Wiwa was a member of the Ogoni people, an ethnic minority in Nigeria whose homeland, Ogoniland, in the Niger Delta has been targeted for crude oil extraction since the 1950s and which has suffered extreme environmental damage from decades of indiscriminate petroleum waste dumping. Initially as spokesperson, and then as President of the Movement for the Survival of the Ogoni People (MOSOP), Saro-Wiwa led a nonviolent campaign against environmental degradation of the land and waters of Ogoniland by the operations of the multinational petroleum industry, especially the Royal Dutch Shell Company.He was also an outspoken critic of the Nigerian government, which he viewed as reluctant to enforce environmental regulations on the foreign petroleum companies operating in the area.
    At the peak of his non-violent campaign, Saro-Wiwa was arrested, hastily tried by a special military tribunal and hanged in 1995 by the military government of General Sani Abacha, all on charges wideley viewed as entirely politically motivated and completely unfounded.His execution provoked international outrage and resulted in Nigeria’s suspension from the Commonwealth of Nations for over three years.

  13. 1. Protest placard about governmments’ lies about the Prestige and wai in Irak. Image 11.
    2. Students watching The Tar Museum by Mark Dion, 2006. Image 37.
    3. Newspape’scut extarct. Man’s dream about the Black Whole. Image 2.
    4. Sailors’ demostration before Compostela’s cathedral.”The burial”. Image 25.
    5. Students watching photographs by Allan Sekula Black Tide, 2002. Image 15.
    6. Children going to school under posters related to the black tide’s protests. Image 8.
    7. Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from a blue plastic oil container (head) with a black hat on top. Image 31.
    8. Cartoon by El Roto “We must prevent the oil spill reaches cousciouness”. Image 24.
    9. Students approaching False Movement (balance and economic sustainability) by Damián Ortega. 1999 – 2003. Image 10.
    10. Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from a plastic containers. Black hair with shells. Image 34.
    11. Volunteer on the rocks surrounded by oil. Image 26.
    12. Obradoiro Vocal Vila de Ponteareas singing The Post petrolistic Internationale by Chistina Hemauer and Roman Keller, 2009 – 2012 for A Balea Negra exhibition. Image 48.
    13. Man showing his pain. Image 1.
    14. Green picture dealing with the impact of oil spills in nature and life. Image 12.
    15. Pool by Marcela Armas, 2006. Tank with a car handle floating over burnt oil. Image 46.
    16. The Tar Museum – Flamingo by Mark Dion, 2006. Image 40.
    18/19/20/21/22. “Lord take my soul, but the struggle continues”. Ken Saro-Wiwa last words before he was hanged in a prision in Port Harcout , in eastern Nigeria, on the ordes or General Abacha , the militeray leader of Nigeria. Ken Saro-Wiwa was a highly successful writer(Sozaboy, “ANovel in Rotten English”), producer of Nigeria’s most popular TV soap opera in the mid-eighthies “Basi & Co”, intellectual and activist.
    Saro-Wiwa was a member of the Ogoni people, an ethnic minority in Nigeria whose homeland, Ogoniland, in the Niger Delta has been targeted for crude oil extration since the 1950s and which has suffered extreme enviromental damage from decades of indiscriminate petroleum waste dumping . Initially as spokesperson, and then as President of the movement for the Survival of the Ogoni People (MOSOP), Saro-Wiwa led nonvilent campaign against environmetal degradation of the land and waters of Ogoniland by the operations of the multinational petroleum industry, especially the Royal Dutch Shell Company. He was also on outspoken critic of the Nigerian government, which he viewed as reluctanto to enforce environmental regulations on the foreign petroleum companies operating in the area.
    At the peak of his non-violent campaing, Sari-Wiwa was arrested, hastly tried by a special military tribunal and hanged in 1995 by the military government of General Sani Abacha, all on charges wideley viewed as entirely polotically motivated and completely unfoundead. His execution provoked international outrage and resulted in Nigeria’s suspension from the Commonwealth of Nations for over three years. Images: 51, 52, 53, 54, 55.
    23. Posters, posteacards, cards and stiekers related Never Again (Nunca Máis) movement 2002 – 2005. Image 27.
    24. Prestige’s bitt. Image 5.
    25. 26. Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from a red plastic oil container and loudspeakers (ears) and machinery, eletrical fuses, etc. (eyes and brains). Image 35.
    27. Students watching False Movement (balance and aconomic sustainability) by Damián Ortega. Image 13.
    28.RIP cross protesting against death in oceans. Image 20.
    29. Prestige shipwreck. Picture by Galician photographer Xurxo Lobato, 2003 Ortega y Gasset Journalist Award. Image 4.
    30. Cartoon by El Roto “Somewhere on the east coast… OIL! WE’RE RICH! Image 22.
    31. Rainbow Warrior (Greenpeace) in Galicia. Image 23.
    32. Volunteer’s soup. Photograph by Allan Sekula, Black Tide, 2002. Image 7.
    33. Students putting on gloves to open a book. Image 45.
    34.The Tar Museum – Mammal by Mark Dion, 2006. Image 39.
    35. “All of us are Never Again” magazine cover. Image 16.
    36. Students watching photographs by Allan Sekula, Black Tide, 2002. Image 19.
    37. Genocide in Nigeria, Collection of newspapers and articles written in the 1970s and 1980s by Sar-Wiwa. The articles document his political and environmental concerns about the fate of the Ogoni people and their mistreatmen by multinational oil compaines and collaborating Nigerian government. Saro-Wiwa argues that the Ogoni are minority in Nigeria, exploited by the ruling ethnic majority, and that the Federal Government of Nigeria was threatening the Ogoni with genocide. At the time this was a key publication in bringing the Ogoni tragedy to the attention of the international community. Nowadays, it is of continual relevance to present day concerns about the actions of the oil companies, indigenous and environmental rights in the Delta region. Image 49.
    38. We need concious citizen who think demand and act protest placard. Image 28.
    39. Students listening to the guide’s explanations. Image 29.
    40. Picture by Antón Patiño(1987), “Coast of Death” (Galicia). Image 9.
    41. Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from an oil container (head) and a bet of brack, red and yellow wires (hair). Image 30.
    42. Volunteers collecting tar and oil from the sand. Image 14.
    43. Students listening to the guide before Alaskans still fighting for the Earth by Andrea Bowes AND mAVIS Müller (2009). Image 43.
    44. Bagdad City. 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from a plastic oil container. Black hair with braids and shells. Image 33.
    45. Students obseving and talking about a photograph by Allan Sekula. Black Tide, 2002. Image 21.
    46. Man surroundead by his works of art on Camelle coast. Image 3.
    47. Suiteases demonstration. A Coruña, 2003. Image 17.
    48. General view of The Tar Museum by Mark Dion, 2006. Image 38.
    49. Students watching a collection of cartoons by El Roto. Image 42.
    50. Students opening a book with globes on. Image 44.
    51. Students reading The Postpetrlistic Internationale partiture by Christina Hemauer and Roman Keller, 2009 – 2012. Image 47.
    52. Mever Again (Nunca Máis) demonstration. Image 6.
    53. The Tar Museum – Mallard by Mark Dion, 2006. Image 41.
    54. Fragment from the weekly newspaper The Observer dealing with Saro-Wiwa execution and Shell Oil Company’s involvement. Image 50.
    55. Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè made from a blue and yellow plastic oil container (head) and yellow rope (hair). Image 32.7. Less oil, more courage. Rikrit Tiravanija, 2009. Image 36.
    1

  14. 1-Man showing his pain.
    2-Newspaper’s cut extract. Man’s dream about the Black Whale.
    3- Man surrounded by his works of art on Camelle coast.6-
    4- Prestige shipwreck. Picture by Galician photographer Xurxo Lobato. 2003 Ortega y Gasset Journalism Award.
    5-Prestige’s bitt.
    6-Never Again (Nunca Máis) demonstration.
    7-Volunteer’s soup. Photograph by Allan Sekula. Black Tide, 2002.
    8-Children going to school under posters related to the black tide’s protests
    9- Picture by Antón Patiño (1987), “Coast of Death” (Galicia)
    10-Students watching False Movement (balance and economic sustainability) by Damián Ortega.
    11-Protest placard about governments’ lies about the Prestige and war in Irak.
    12- Green picture dealing with the impact of oil spills in nature and life.
    13–Students approaching False Movement (balance and economic sustainability) by Damián Ortega.1999 – 2003.
    14-Volunteers collecting tar and oil from the sand.
    15-Students observing and talking about a photograph by Allan Sekula. Black Tide, 2002.
    16- “All of us are Never Again” magazine cover.
    17-Posters, postcards, cards and stickers related Never Again (Nunca Máis) movement. 2002 –
    2003
    18-Protest placards relating Prestige’s black tide (“Never Again”) to Irak war (“No to War”)
    19-Students watching photographs by Allan Sekula Black Tide, 2002.
    20-RIP cross protesting against death in oceans.
    21-Students watching photographs by Allan Sekula Black Tide, 2002.
    22-Cartoon by El Roto “Somewhere on the east coast…OIL! WE’RE RICH!
    23-Rainbow Warrior (Greenpeace) in Galicia.
    24- Cartoon by El Roto “We must prevent the oil spill reaches cousciousness”
    25- Sailors’ demonstration before Compostela’s cathedral. “The burial”.
    26-Volunteer on the rocks surrounded by oil.
    27-Posters, postcards, cards and stickers related Never Again (Nunca Máis) movement. 2002 –
    2003
    28-“We need conscious citizens who think, demand and act” protest placard.
    29-Students listening to the guide’s explanations.
    30- Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from an old tin oil container(head) and a set of black, red and yellow wires (hair).
    31-Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from a blue plastic oil container (head) with a black hat on top.
    32-Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from a blue and yellow plastic oil container(head) and yellow rope(hair).
    33-Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from a plastic oil container. Black hair with braids and shells.
    34- Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from a plastic oil container. Black hair with shells.
    35-Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from a red plastic oil container and loudspeakers (ears) and machinery, electrical fuses, etc. (eyes and brains).
    36-Less oil, more courage. Rikrit Tiravanija, 2009.
    37-Students watching The Tar Museum by Mark Dion, 2006.
    38-General view of The Tar Museum by Mark Dion, 2006.
    39-The Tar Museum – Mammal by Mark Dion, 2006.
    40-The Tar Museum – Flamingo by Mark Dion, 2006.
    41-The Tar Museum – Mallard by Mark Dion, 2006.
    42-Students watching a collection of cartoons by El Roto.
    43-Students listening to the guide before Alaskans still fighting for the Earth by Andrea Bowers
    and Mavis Müller (2009).
    44-Students opening a book with gloves on.
    45-Students putting on gloves to open a book
    46- Pool by Marcela Armas, 2006. Tank with a car handle floating over burnt oil.
    47-Students reading The Postpetrolistic Internationale partiture by Christina Hemauer and Roman Keller, 2009 – 2012.
    48-Obradoiro Vocal Vila de Ponteareas singing The Postpetrolistic Internationale by Christina
    49–Genocide in Nigeria, Collection of newspapers and articles written in the 1970s and 1980s by
    Saro-Wiwa. The articles document his political and environmental concerns about the fate of the
    Ogoni people and their mistreatment by multinational oil companies and collaborating Nigerian
    government. Saro-Wiwa argues that the Ogoni are a minority in Nigeria, exploited by the ruling
    ethnic majority, and that the Federal Government of Nigeria was threatening the Ogoni with
    genocide. At the time this was a key publication in bringing the Ogoni tragedy to the attention of the
    international community. Nowadays, it is of continual relevance to present day concerns about the
    actions of the oil companies, indigenous and environmental rights in the Delta region.
    50- Fragment from the weekly newspaper The Observer dealing with Saro-Wiwa excecution and Shell Oil Company’s involvement.
    51,52,53,54,55-“Lord take my soul, but the struggle continues”. Ken Saro-Wiwa last words
    before he was hanged in a prison in Port Harcourt, in eastern Nigeria, on the orders of General
    Abacha, the militeray leader of Nigeria. Ken Saro-Wiwa was a highly successful writer (Sozaboy,
    “A Novel in Rotten English”), producer of Nigeria’s most popular TV soap opera in the mideighthies “Basi & Co”, intellectual and activist.
    Saro-Wiwa was a member of the Ogoni people, an ethnic minority in Nigeria whose homeland,
    Ogoniland, in the Niger Delta has been targeted for crude oil extraction since the 1950s and which
    has suffered extreme environmental damage from decades of indiscriminate petroleum waste
    dumping. Initially as spokesperson, and then as President of the Movement for the Survival of the
    Ogoni People (MOSOP), Saro-Wiwa led a nonviolent campaign against environmental degradation
    of the land and waters of Ogoniland by the operations of the multinational petroleum industry,
    especially the Royal Dutch Shell Company. He was also an outspoken critic of the Nigerian
    government, which he viewed as reluctant to enforce environmental regulations on the foreign
    petroleum companies operating in the area.
    At the peak of his non-violent campaign, Saro-Wiwa was arrested, hastily tried by a special military
    tribunal and hanged in 1995 by the military government of General Sani Abacha, all on charges
    wideley viewed as entirely politically motivated and completely unfounded. His execution
    provoked international outrage and resulted in Nigeria’s suspension from the Commonwealth of
    Nations for over three years.

  15. 1-13.- Man showing his pain.
    2-3.- Newspaper’s cut extract. Man’s dream about the Black Whale.
    3-46.- Man surrounded by his works of art on Camelle coast.
    4-29.- Prestige shipwreck. Picture by Galician photographer Xurxo Lobato. 2003 Ortega y Gasset Journalism Award.
    5-24.- Prestige’s bitt
    6-52.- Never Again (Nunca Máis) demonstration.
    7-32.- Volunteer’s soup. Photograph by Allan Sekula. Black Tide, 2002.
    8-6.- Children going to school under posters related to the black tide’s protests.
    9-40.- Picture by Antón Patiño (1987), “Coast of Death” (Galicia)
    10-9.- Students approaching False Movement (balance and economic sustainability) by Damián Ortega.1999 – 2003.
    11-1.- Protest placard about governments’ lies about the Prestige and war in Irak.
    12-14.- Green picture dealing with the impact of oil spills in nature and life.
    13-27.- Students watching False Movement (balance and economic sustainability) by Damián Ortega.1999 – 2004.
    14-42.- Volunteers collecting tar and oil from the sand.
    15-45.- Students observing and talking about a photograph by Allan Sekula. Black Tide, 2002.
    16-35.- “All of us are Never Again” magazine cover.
    17-23.- Posters, postcards, cards and stickers related Never Again (Nunca Máis) movement. 2002 –2003.
    18-25.- Protest placards relating Prestige’s black tide (“Never Again”) to Irak war (“No to War”)
    19-36.- Students watching photographs by Allan Sekula Black Tide, 2002.
    20-28.- RIP cross protesting against death in oceans.
    21-5.- Students watching photographs by Allan Sekula Black Tide, 2002.
    22-30.- Cartoon by El Roto “Somewhere on the east coast…OIL! WE’RE RICH!
    23-31.- Rainbow Warrior(Greenpeace) in Galicia.
    24-8.- Cartoon by El Roto “We must prevent the oil spill reaches cousciousness”
    25-4.- Sailors’ demonstration before Compostela’s cathedral. “The burial”.
    26-11.- Volunteer on the rocks surrounded by oil.
    27-47.- Suitcases demonstration. A Coruña, 2003.
    28-38.- “We need conscious citizens who think, demand and act” protest placard.
    29-39.- Students listening to the guide’s explanations.
    30-41.- Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from an old tin oil container(head) and a set of black, red and yellow wires (hair).
    31-7.- Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from a blue plastic oil container (head) with a black hat on top.
    32-55.- Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from a blue and yellow plastic oil container(head) and yellow rope(hair).
    33-44.- Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from a plastic oil container. Black hair with braids and shells.
    34-10.- Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from a plastic oil container. Black hair with shells.
    35-26.- Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from a red plastic oil container and loudspeakers (ears) and machinery, electrical fuses, etc. (eyes and brains).
    36-17.- Less oil, more courage. Rikrit Tiravanija, 2009.
    37-2.- Students watching The Tar Museum by Mark Dion, 2006.
    38-48.- General view of The Tar Museum by Mark Dion, 2006.
    39-34.- The Tar Museum – Mammal by Mark Dion, 2006.
    40-16.- The Tar Museum – Flamingo by Mark Dion, 2006.
    41-53.- The Tar Museum – Mallard by Mark Dion, 2006.
    42-49.- Students watching a collection of cartoons by El Roto.
    43-43.- Students listening to the guide before Alaskans still fighting for the Earth by Andrea Bowers and Mavis Müller (2009).
    44-50.- Students opening a book with gloves on.
    45-33.- Students putting on gloves to open a book.
    46-15.- Pool by Marcela Armas, 2006. Tank with a car handle floating over burnt oil.
    47-51.- Students reading The Postpetrolistic Internationale partiture by Christina Hemauer and Roman Keller, 2009 – 2012.
    48-12.- Obradoiro Vocal Vila de Ponteareas singing The Postpetrolistic Internationale by Christina Hemauer and Roman Keller, 2009 – 2012 for A Balea Negra exhibition.
    49-37.- Genocide in Nigeria, Collection of newspapers and articles written in the 1970s and 1980s by Saro-Wiwa. The articles document his political and environmental concerns about the fate of the Ogoni people and their mistreatment by multinational oil companies and collaborating Nigerian government. Saro-Wiwa argues that the Ogoni are a minority in Nigeria, exploited by the ruling ethnic majority, and that the Federal Government of Nigeria was threatening the Ogoni with genocide. At the time this was a key publication in bringing the Ogoni tragedy to the attention of the international community. Nowadays, it is of continual relevance to present day concerns about the actions of the oil companies, indigenous and environmental rights in the Delta region.
    50-54.- Fragment from the weekly newspaper The Observer dealing with Saro-Wiwa excecution and Shell Oil Company’s involvement.

  16. 1 , 13. –> Man showing his pain.
    2 , 3. –> Newspaper’s cut extract. Man’s dream about the Black Whale.
    3 , 46. –> Man surrounded by his works of art on Camelle coast.
    4 , 29.- –>Prestige shipwreck. Picture by Galician photographer Xurxo Lobato. 2003 Ortega y Gasset Journalism Award.
    5 , 24.—> Prestige’s bitt
    6 , 52.—> Never Again (Nunca Máis) demonstration.
    7 , 32.—-> Volunteer’s soup. Photograph by Allan Sekula. Black Tide, 2002.
    8 , 6.—-> Children going to school under posters related to the black tide’s protests.
    9 , 40.—-> Picture by Antón Patiño (1987), “Coast of Death” (Galicia)
    10 , 9.—–> Students approaching False Movement (balance and economic sustainability) by Damián Ortega.1999 – 2003.
    11 , 1.—–> Protest placard about governments’ lies about the Prestige and war in Irak.
    12 , 14.—-> Green picture dealing with the impact of oil spills in nature and life.
    13 , 27.—-> Students watching False Movement (balance and economic sustainability) by Damián Ortega.1999 – 2004.
    14 , 42.—–> Volunteers collecting tar and oil from the sand.
    15 , 45.—-> Students observing and talking about a photograph by Allan Sekula. Black Tide, 2002.
    16 , 35.—-> “All of us are Never Again” magazine cover.
    17 , 23.—-> Posters, postcards, cards and stickers related Never Again (Nunca Máis) movement. 2002 –2003.
    18 , 25.—-> Protest placards relating Prestige’s black tide (“Never Again”) to Irak war (“No to War”)
    19 , 36.—-> Students watching photographs by Allan Sekula Black Tide, 2002.
    20 , 28.—-> RIP cross protesting against death in oceans.
    21 ,5.—-> Students watching photographs by Allan Sekula Black Tide, 2002.
    22 , 30.—> Cartoon by El Roto “Somewhere on the east coast…OIL! WE’RE RICH!
    23 , 31.- Rainbow Warrior(Greenpeace) in Galicia.
    24-8.—-> Cartoon by El Roto “We must prevent the oil spill reaches cousciousness”
    25 , 4.—-> Sailors’ demonstration before Compostela’s cathedral. “The burial”.
    26 , 11.—-> Volunteer on the rocks surrounded by oil.
    27 , 47.—-> Suitcases demonstration. A Coruña, 2003.
    28 , 38.—-> “We need conscious citizens who think, demand and act” protest placard.
    29 , 39.—-> Students listening to the guide’s explanations.
    30 , 41.—> Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from an old tin oil container(head) and a set of black, red and yellow wires (hair).
    31 , 7.—-> Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from a blue plastic oil container (head) with a black hat on top.
    32 , 55.—> Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from a blue and yellow plastic oil container(head) and yellow rope(hair).
    33 , 44.—-> Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from a plastic oil container. Black hair with braids and shells.
    34 , 10.–> Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from a plastic oil container. Black hair with shells.
    35 , 26.—-> Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from a red plastic oil container and loudspeakers (ears) and machinery, electrical fuses, etc. (eyes and brains).
    36 , 17.—-> Less oil, more courage. Rikrit Tiravanija, 2009.
    37 , 2.—-> Students watching The Tar Museum by Mark Dion, 2006.
    38 , 48.—-> General view of The Tar Museum by Mark Dion, 2006.
    39 , 34.—-> The Tar Museum – Mammal by Mark Dion, 2006.
    40 , 16.—-> The Tar Museum – Flamingo by Mark Dion, 2006.
    41 , 53.—> The Tar Museum – Mallard by Mark Dion, 2006.
    42 , 49.—> Students watching a collection of cartoons by El Roto.
    43 , 43.—-> Students listening to the guide before Alaskans still fighting for the Earth by Andrea Bowers and Mavis Müller (2009).
    44 , 50.—> Students opening a book with gloves on.
    45 , 33.—-> Students putting on gloves to open a book.
    46 , 15.—> Pool by Marcela Armas, 2006. Tank with a car handle floating over burnt oil.
    47 , 51.—-> Students reading The Postpetrolistic Internationale partiture by Christina Hemauer and Roman Keller, 2009 – 2012.
    48 , 12.—-> Obradoiro Vocal Vila de Ponteareas singing The Postpetrolistic Internationale by Christina Hemauer and Roman Keller, 2009 – 2012 for A Balea Negra exhibition.
    49 , 37.—-> Genocide in Nigeria, Collection of newspapers and articles written in the 1970s and 1980s by Saro-Wiwa. The articles document his political and environmental concerns about the fate of the Ogoni people and their mistreatment by multinational oil companies and collaborating Nigerian government. Saro-Wiwa argues that the Ogoni are a minority in Nigeria, exploited by the ruling ethnic majority, and that the Federal Government of Nigeria was threatening the Ogoni with genocide. At the time this was a key publication in bringing the Ogoni tragedy to the attention of the international community. Nowadays, it is of continual relevance to present day concerns about the actions of the oil companies, indigenous and environmental rights in the Delta region.
    50 , 54.—-> Fragment from the weekly newspaper The Observer dealing with Saro-Wiwa excecution and Shell Oil Company’s involvement.

  17. mage 1- Man showing his pain.
    Image 2- New spaper´s cut extracting. Man about the Black Whale.
    Image 3- Man surrounded bylis works of art on lamelle coast.
    Image 6- Never Again demostration.
    Image 8- Children going to school under posters related to the black tide´s protests.
    Image 10- Studets watching False Movement[economic) by Damián Ortega.1999 – 2004.
    Image 12- Green picture dealing with the impact of oil spills in nature and life.
    Image 13- Students watching False Moment (balance and economic sustain ability) by Damián Ortega.
    Image 14- Volunteers collecting tar and oil from the sand.
    Image 16- “All of us are Never Again” magazine cover.
    Image 17-Posters, postcards, cards and stickers related Never Again movement. 2002 – 2003.
    Image 18-Protest placards relating Prestige’s black to Irak .
    Image 20- RIP cross protesting against death in oceans
    Image 22-Cartoon by El Roto “Somewhere on the east coast… OIL! WE’RE RICH!.
    Image 23-Rainbow Warriogreenpeace) in Galicia.
    Image 24-Cartoon by El Roto “We must prevent the oil spill reaches cousciousness”
    Image 25-Sailors’ demonstration before Compostela’s cathedral. “The burial”
    Image 26-Volunteer on the rocks surrounded by oil.
    Image 27-Suitcases demonstration. A Coruña, 2003.
    Image 28-“We need conscious citizens who think, demand and act” protest placard.
    Image 30-Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from an old tin oil container and a set of black, red and yellow wires.
    Image 35- Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from a red plastic oil container and
    loudspeakers (ears) and machinery, electrical fuse.
    Image 36-Less oil, more courage. Rikrit Tiravanija, 2009.
    Image 40-The Tar Museum – Flamingo by Mark Dion, 2006.
    Image 43- Students listening to the guide before Alaskans still fighting for the Earth by Andrea Bowers and Mavis Müller (2009).
    Image 44-Students opening a book with gloves on.
    Image 45-Students putting on gloves to open a book.
    Image 47-Suitcases demonstration. A Coruña, 2003.
    Image 48-Obradoiro Ville singing The Postpetrolistic Internationale by Christina Hemauer and Roman Keller, 2009 – 2012 for A Balea Negra exhibition.
    Image 49-Genocide in Nigeria, Collection of newspapers and articles written in the 1970s and 1980s by Saro-Wiwa.

  18. 1. Protest placard about governmments’ lies about the Prestige and wai in Irak. Image 11.
    2. Students watching The Tar Museum by Mark Dion, 2006. Image 37.
    3. Newspape’scut extarct. Man’s dream about the Black Whole. Image 2.
    4. Sailors’ demostration before Compostela’s cathedral.”The burial”. Image 25.
    5. Students watching photographs by Allan Sekula Black Tide, 2002. Image 15.
    6. Children going to school under posters related to the black tide’s protests. Image 8.
    7. Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from a blue plastic oil container (head) with a black hat on top. Image 31.
    8. Cartoon by El Roto “We must prevent the oil spill reaches cousciouness”. Image 24.
    9. Students approaching False Movement (balance and economic sustainability) by Damián Ortega. 1999 – 2003. Image 10.
    10. Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from a plastic containers. Black hair with shells. Image 34.
    11. Volunteer on the rocks surrounded by oil. Image 26.
    12. Obradoiro Vocal Vila de Ponteareas singing The Post petrolistic Internationale by Chistina Hemauer and Roman Keller, 2009 – 2012 for A Balea Negra exhibition. Image 48.
    13. Man showing his pain. Image 1.
    14. Green picture dealing with the impact of oil spills in nature and life. Image 12.
    15. Pool by Marcela Armas, 2006. Tank with a car handle floating over burnt oil. Image 46.
    16. The Tar Museum – Flamingo by Mark Dion, 2006. Image 40.

  19. 1-Man showing his pain.
    2- New spaper´s cut extracting. Man about the Black Whale.
    3- Man surrounded bylis works of art on lamelle coast
    4- Prestige shipwreck. Picture by Galician photographer Xurxo Lobato. 2003 Ortega y Gasset Journalism Award

  20. 1:man showing his pain
    2:newspaper´s cut xtract man´s dream about the Black Whale.
    3: Man surrounded bylis works of art on lamelle coast
    8:Children going to school under posters related to the black tide´s protests.
    20: RIP cross protesting against death in oceans
    26:Volunteer on the rocks surrounded by oil.
    40:The Tar Museum – Flamingo by Mark Dion, 2006.
    47:Suitcases demonstration. A Coruña, 2003.

  21. Image 1- Man showing his pain.
    Image 2- New spaper´s cut extract. Man´s dream about the Black Whale.
    Image 3- Man surrounded bylis works of art on lamelle coast.
    Image 6- Never Again (Nunca máis) demostration.
    Image 8- Children going to school under posters related to the black tide´s protests.
    Image 10- Students watching False Movement (balance and economic sustainability) by Damián Ortega.1999 – 2004.
    Image 12- Green picture dealing with the impact of oil spills in nature and life.
    Image 13- Students watching False Moment (balance and economic sustain ability) by Damián Ortega.
    Image 14- Volunteers collecting tar and oil from the sand.
    Image 16- “All of us are Never Again” magazine cover.
    Image 17-Posters, postcards, cards and stickers related Never Again (Nunca Máis) movement. 2002 – 2003.
    Image 20- RIP cross protesting against death in oceans
    Image 22-Cartoon by El Roto “Somewhere on the east coast… OIL! WE’RE RICH!.
    Image 23-Rainbow Warriogreenpeace) in Galicia.
    Image 24-Cartoon by El Roto “We must prevent the oil spill reaches cousciousness”
    Image 25-Sailors’ demonstration before Compostela’s cathedral. “The burial”
    Image 26-Volunteer on the rocks surrounded by oil.
    Image 27-Suitcases demonstration. A Coruña, 2003.
    Image 28-“We need conscious citizens who think, demand and act” protest placard.
    Image 30-Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from an old tin oil container and a set of black, red and yellow wires.
    Image 35- Bagdad City, 1992. Romuald Hazoumè. Mask made from a red plastic oil container and
    loudspeakers (ears) and machinery, electrical fuse.
    Image 36-Less oil, more courage. Rikrit Tiravanija, 2009.
    Image 40-The Tar Museum – Flamingo by Mark Dion, 2006.
    Image 43- Students listening to the guide before Alaskans still fighting for the Earth by Andrea Bowers and Mavis Müller (2009).
    Image 44-Students opening a book with gloves on.
    Image 45-Students putting on gloves to open a book.
    Image 47-Suitcases demonstration. A Coruña, 2003.
    Image 48-Obradoiro Vocal Vila de Ponteareas singing The Postpetrolistic Internationale by Christina Hemauer and Roman Keller, 2009 – 2012 for A Balea Negra exhibition.
    Image 49-Genocide in Nigeria, Collection of newspapers and articles written in the 1970s and 1980s by Saro-Wiwa. The articles document his political and environmental concerns about the fate of the
    Ogoni people and their mistreatment by multinational oil companies and collaborating Nigerian
    government. Saro-Wiwa argues that the Ogoni are a minority in Nigeria, exploited by the ruling
    ethnic majority, and that the Federal Government of Nigeria was threatening the Ogoni with
    genocide. At the time this was a key publication in bringing the Ogoni tragedy to the attention of the
    international community. Nowadays, it is of continual relevance to present day concerns about the
    actions of the oil companies, indigenous and environmental rights in the Delta región.

  22. “A BALEA NEGRA”
    1. Man is sad.
    2. A newspaper with the headline: “Man y el sueño de la ballena negra”
    3.The dream´s Man.
    4. Prestige´s shipwreck.
    6.People say: never again!
    7. A man´s eating soup.
    8. Childrens going to school and behind slogans: “Ata cando” and “Nunca máis”
    9.Prediction picture.
    10. Students watching False Movement.
    11. A poster with the slogan: “As mentiras son armas de destrucción masiva”
    12. A sample to the oil.
    13. Students watching False Movement.
    14. Volunteers cleaning.
    15. Students talking about the photography.
    16. All are never again.
    17. “Never again” posters.
    18. Protest posters.
    19. Students watching a photography.
    20. A RIP cross.
    21. Students watching photographies.
    22. A ironic photography.
    23. Greenpeace in Galicia.
    24. A ironic photography.
    25. Prestige´s demonstration.
    26. Volunteer is cleaning rocks.
    27.Suitcases “never again”.
    28. A slogan.
    29. Students listening to the guide.
    30/31/32/33/34/35. Figures.
    36. A slogan : “Less oil more courage”
    37.Students watching to the figures.
    38. Animals tainting to the oil.
    39. A figure tainted.
    40. A bird tainted.
    41. A duck tainted.
    42. Drawings.
    43. Students listening to guide.
    44. Students opening a book.
    45. A black book.
    47. Students reading.
    49. A new.
    50. A headline newspaper.
    51/52/53/54/55. Slogans.

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